OF GENERAL INTEREST UP TO 1959

The material that follows was gleaned mainly from the Trident, which had great coverage of not only SCHS, but the whole league as well. Some items came from yearbooks.

Since the Trident was our best source of information, here is something about the SCHS print shop, which makes it possible to get out a high school paper every week and later on every two weeks. It is a three year vocational program, which took up three class periods, plus English, physical Science and PE.

During their time in class, students learned typesetting on the linotype machines. In some print shops, students would receive half a year credit for each year in print shop class, toward their apprenticeship.

Once linotype was no longer used to print papers this class was no longer needed. At that time, it became more difficult to get the Tridents out as often and with as many pages.

From Trident of March 28, 1947 with a picture. The original SCHS was located on the present Mission Hill Junior High site, which burnt down. It was replaced by a two story building at the corner of Walnut and California Streets where the present building now stands. The original site was considered one of the most modern and accommodating schools in all of California at that time. It was occupied in 1895 to October 1, 1913, when it was destroyed by fire of unknown origin.

Students come from as far North as Felton and South to Aptos, plus East into the Santa Cruz mountains. With the size of this area, SCHS was the largest high school on the Central Coast.

NCS stands for North Coast section, which ran from King City in the South to Mendocino county in the North.

1921 Planning for Memorial Field and all athletic facilities was started with the hopes that they would be use not only by the high school, but the whole community. Community groups, individuals and students went to work. Fund raisers, donations, work groups, etc got busy. Teachers worked on the stands, students worked on additions to the gym, dug ditches for the sprinkler system and laid pipe. The class of 1926 donated the money for the Memorial field gate and girls honor donated to the new turf, etc. None of the money came from district funds, just as athletic equipment came out of student body card funds.

The field is named Memorial Field in the name of 11 former SCHS students, women and men, who lost their lives while in the military. At the dedication of the field on May 16, 1925, eleven black Walnut trees were planted along the street side of field. Even though much more needed to be done to complete the Community Athletic and Recreation Center it was a festive time and up lifting to all who participated.

The first unit to come was the gym, then the football field, oval track and the baseball field.

Information from the Trident. The rivalry between Watsonville and Santa Cruz has always has been severe. From the very first records of the CCAL, football information from the Tridents of 1909, we see that an intense desire for victory has driven the two schools in hard fought contests. Forty years have marked an epoch of good football that has been tooth and nail all the way. The football rivalry between Santa Cruz and Watsonville goes back to 1909, when Santa Cruz slaughtered Watsonville 5-0. The following year SCHS won again 6-0. Rugby football was born to the CCAL turfs in 1910, when we changed from American football, because it was to vicious. Rugby proved much rougher.
The first sign of trouble between the two schools showed in 1911, when the game was scheduled to be played at Watsonville, but Santa Cruz cancelled the game. However, the Watsonville team and officials appeared at the field and declared that we had forfeited the game. There is no notice of 1912. In 1913 we won 14-12 in rugby. We won again in 1914, 9-0 to win the league championship. No more football of any sort was played until the school year 1921, when American football was again played. The Cards started off with a 2-2 record and second place in the league.

From the Trident dated September 13, 1922:
Finally Santa Cruz Hi is to have a gym–the building for which she has hoped and worked so long and so enthusiastically. Carpenters are now working on the building, which is on the site of the old track barn. The work will probably be completed in a month or two.

One of the most appealing features of the gym is a large indoor basketball court with a seating capacity of over seven hundred. Good bye to the old Casino court!

Many new showers are to be put in for the boys, and there will be twice as much locker and dressing room. The girls will have several showers and individual dressing rooms.

The class of 1923 decided to have a pictorial review in place of a traditional yearbook. To spend the money saved on a Memorial Gate at the entrance of Memorial Park.

Much was done toward discouraging the old ideas of class antagonism, which is a big step in the right direction. No more hazing.

1924
In 1924 “Dad” Gould at 78 with 20 years as the SC head janitor retired. From the Trident.
His friendliness, good nature and patience, has endeared him to all those he has come in contact with.

In the early twenties the school and community worked to make the school field, the lower field area, which is now the area covered by the football and softball fields, a Community Park. It would be called Memorial Park in honor of the eleven former students from SCHS who died during World War I. The area where the girls junior varsity field is now was the baseball field. Also in the area abutting Laurel street a girls field was put in.

When the configuration of the area was changed later, it took its present name Memorial Field still in honor the same eleven, who gave up their lives in World War II. All their names are inscribed on the wall of the entrance way into the main building.

In the mid forties city “A” league softball was played on the present football field while the rest of the leagues games were played at De Laveaga Park. Home plate was on the street side of the field facing Laurel Street. As a fund raiser, Donkey softball was played periodically. A player after hitting the ball, had to pull the donkeys around the bases. One of the players had an easier time moving the donkeys, since he worked with the mule pack in the Army.

Organizations would use the field for different activities. One of the groups, the Portuguese Association held their Festia and had great fire works for July 4TH.

Article in the January 25th 1924 Trident titled “Four Years Ago Today” states that the petition for building a High School Gymnasium was given to the Board of Education. Santa Cruz High won the C.C.A.L. basketball championship by defeating Hollister 52-9. This looks like a good omen.

A series of films were shown under the direction of the Junior Class for the purpose of raising money for the Junior Prom. The Armory burned and with it everything the high school and basketball squad owned in the way of athletic equipment.

One of the most appealing features of the gym is a large indoor basketball court with a seating capacity of over seven hundred. Goodbye to the Armory and the old Casino court!

Many new showers are to be put in for the boys, and there will be twice as much locker and dressing room. The girls will have several showers and individual dressing rooms.

One part of the new equipment being bought will be a cage ball, with which many games can be played, it was used in many of the army camps during the war. Now that we will be having a real gym, we can do better work both in physical education and in athletics.

The CCAL has been divided up in different ways over the course of its existence, which makes it difficult to follow. Who is in which league this year is always a question. The schools could be divided into “A” and “B” leagues for all sports or differently for different sports, or all schools in the same league. This year, 1924 it is two leagues with the “A” league consisting of SC, Watsonville, Hollister and Salinas. The “B” league of Monterey, Pacific Grove, Gonzales and King City.

Coaches: Eakin, football; Damkroger, basketball; CE “Doc” Fehliman, baseball; Stevens, tennis. Track had multiple coaches headed by principal G.A. Bond with assistants Eakin, Damkroger and Paul Levy.

In 1929 and 1930 the lightweights were CCAL champs and played in the finals of the NCS (North Coast Section). They won the league 6 times in a row from 1925 the beginning of the league to 1930.

1930 Baseball caps were late coming due to lack of funds in the student body which funded athletics not the school board. Caps cost $1.10.

1931 Heavyweights had nothing to do with size, but were present day varsity teams. Lightweights actually were mainly smaller players and in some years were called the limiteds. There were three criteria to be able to play lightweights. They were height, weight and age. Players could play lightweights all four years, if they met the criteria. Lightweight teams were eliminated in 1972 and were replaced by junior varsity and freshmen teams.

Students in Santa Cruz were dismissed at 2:15 on March 29, 1931 to attend the baseball game between the major league New York Giants and the Seattle Indians of the Pacific Coast league. Students under 14 were given season passes.

1932. Trident has the new football rules for the 1932 season. USF and Cal tried them out in April. Runners are considered down the moment any part of his body other than hands or feet hits the ground. Before this season, the runner was not considered stopped until he could not move forward. Previously the runner could have his feet taken from under him, but he could get up and keep running until someone held him down. Before that he was not down until he declared himself down. That caused a lot of problems of piling on etc.

Also later in 1932 there were changes in football rules. Previously any player caught illegally using their hands were disqualified from the game. New rule is a 15 yard penalty.

1934 There will be no play offs between the “A” and “B” leagues.

1934 President of the Santa Cruz school board, said that since SCHS is the biggest school in the league, it’s teams should be more successful and have better fan support in order to be able to spend the kind of money needed to improve conditions of the facilities to improve the success of SCHS athletics.

1934. Track will only allow 6 participants for each event in the CCAL finals to facilitate a quicker and better run meet. A qualifying meet will be held preceding the finals, so only the top six participants in each event will participate in the finals.

The tennis team practices the year around. In the fall they practice three days a week on the Casa Del Ray courts and play tournaments against one another. The regular league play starts in the spring. SCHS has dominated the league over the years..

1935 League did away with the center jump after every score. Only used now at the quarters and start of overtime.

Leo Harris, former SC player brought his Fresno State football team to practice in Santa Cruz in late August for preseason work outs to get away from the heat in the Valley.

1940 A new basketball rule in overtime, the team fouled has a choice of shooting the foul shot or taking the ball out of bounds.

1942 In a span of 16 years, from 1926 to 1942, the lightweight basketball team has won 11 titles.

1942 the NCS (North Coast Section) included the following counties: Alameda, Contra Costa, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, San Benito and Monterey.

1950 A Sad Truth, the Trident sports editor said in his column of March 10, 1950. The CCAL would be a much better league if it kept records. The lack of baseball records is particularly bad. Earned run averages, batting averages, etc, would make the baseball loop stronger.
Football and basketball facts and figures would be excellent, also. The only reason this circuit bothers with track and field records is because a clock and a tape measure are constantly staring officials in the face!

This year produced the largest Letterman’s Society in the history of the school. The reason is due to the increasing number of sophomores and juniors that are lettering. This will provide better teams for the school and community.

Wait “til next year” unpleasant as it may be, we feel the urge to remind everyone that every school in the A division of the CCAL, but SC will have won some kind of championship. Watsonville, bless it’s flinty heart, won the double laurel of titles in football and track. Salinas snatched the basketball and baseball honors. Monterey pulled out wins in Tennis and golf.

1950 Teams tied for first place are called co-champions even if there was a playoff game. Salinas and Watsonville basketball teams had a playoff, not to see who was champion of the league, but to see who would get the right to go to the Tournament of Champions At UC Berkeley.

Scoreboard In Use At Tonight’s Games. The football scoreboard is electrically operated and is definitely a possession of which SCHS can be proud. The Hi Tow Tong put on a carnival to
raise money for it. The board is 20 feet long and 10 feet high. It will show each quarter separately, the down it is and the score.

A basketball rule at this time 1950: If the score is tied at the end of the fourth quarter, an extra period is played and if the score is still tied, a sudden death period follows. The first team to score 2 points wins. Each extra period starts with a center jump ball just as the first overtime did. This happened this year against San Jose Tech.

The league started playing a double round in football to make scheduling easer. With only three league games it made a league season too short. It has made finding practice games for each of the schools less difficult as only three practice games are now needed instead of six to fill out the nine game limit.

CCAL Constitution Undergoes Change. The league Board of Managers was composed of all the principals in the league plus the coaches and all were eligible to vote. Now division A and B will each send one coach as non voting members of the board. This ruling was made, because too much trouble was arising at the meetings when the coaches become involved in heated arguments.

1955 What are the CCAL GOLF FINALS. Good question? All the golf teams meet at the designated course and there are two goals. One is to decide the individual player champion and the other is the team championship.
How they determine the team champion is quite interesting. Each team will enter five men in the tournament. Every one will shoot 18 holes apiece. The best individual score will be awarded a trophy. For team honors, the four men with the lowest scores will be added up and the team with the lowest total score will be crowned the league tournament champions.

1956 The results of the physical fitness tests held in the gym, showed that SCHS boys ranked about equal with those in Europe and far above those in the rest of the 47 states.

1959 In the CCAL, ties are not played off to find a single winner. Instead the two tied teams would be declared Co-Champions. There have been a few cases were Tri-Championships have been crowned. Should there be a tie, a playoff game or games would be held to determine the team to go on to championship tournaments.


SCHS THROUGH THE YEARS

old santa cruz high school
From the Trident of October 24, 1991
About Santa Cruz High. The first session of SCHS in 1878 was held at Mission Hill Grammar School and there were 4 graduates. All grades were taught there with the high school occupying the top floor.
The motto of the school: Sacrifice, Cooperation. Honor and Service.
In 1882 it hit an all time low of no graduates.
In 1913 the school burnt down.
Between 1913 and 1915 the school was rebuilt and classes started at the new building in 1916.
In 1924 the girls’ gym was added and carpentry and machine coursed were introduced.

Hi Tow Tong Men’s Honor Society was organized in 1910. The first initiation ceremonies were adopted embracing the sentiments of Confucius, Jesus and other world leaders to emphasize the thought that leadership ability carries with it the responsibility to serve.

The Girls Honor Society (GHS) was formed in 1922. In 1989 the name was changed to the Women’s Honor Society (WHS). Other organizations that have lasted through the years include the Girls Athletic Association (GAA); 1910 Band; Drama 1912; Art Club 1926.

Turner Gym was dedicated to Pearl Turner the only female student to die in World War One, was demolished in 1972. It was located where the snack bar is and between the football bleachers and the new swimming pool. The current “Fehliman” Gym was finished in 1977. It was dedicated to “Doc” Fehliman, a long time SCHS teacher, who gave much to his students and alumni. He was instrumental in building the Alumni office next to the gym and it being one of the few active ongoing high school Alumni offices in the nation.

The original high school was destroyed in a fire on the night of October 1, 1913. The cause of the fire was never determined but was first seen in the chemistry rooms. During the rebuilding of the school, students attended half day sessions at Bay View and Mission Hill Schools.

The first building specifically for a high school was built in 1895 at California and Walnut streets where the current high school stands today.

The first issue of the Trident was published in 1906.

The eleven Black Walnut trees that border the football field were planted in 1924 to honor the eleven SCH students who died in World War One. Ever wonder why it’s called Memorial Field.”?

Zusa Pitts, class of 1913, became a Hollywood comedienne in the 1920’s.

Ernest Hemingway’s character Robert Jordan in “For Whom The Bell Tolls’ was based in part on Robert Hale Merriman, a SC graduate in the 1920’s whom he met during the Spanish Civil War.

During the 1940’s, requirements for boys PE classes consisted of a rigorous obstacle course including a 20 foot rope climb, a running broad jump of 16 feet, 16 pull ups, 40 push ups and they must carry a person of their own weight for 100 yards. Girls were required to perform conditioning exercises for correcting posture and learn first aid. The purpose was to get students ready for the strenuous training when they went into the military during World War II in the early 1940’s. After the war, students complained about not needing such stringent work outs, since there was no need for them to get ready for the service. The principal told the PE department to tone down the requirements.

Corny Bumpus, class of 1964, played saxophone for the SCHS band and went on to join the Doobie Brothers.

A few who participated in pro sports, when it was not as prevalent as it is now.
Larry Griffin, class of 1965, played for the Harlem Globetrotters for several years after being an All League player and league MVP at Cabrillo College. Larry graduated from Oregon Tech. He had a try-outs for the NFL and with the Warriors of the NBA. He also played basketball over seas. He continued participating in the discus and shot put yearly at Police track events into his sixties and placing in the upper places. He held the league broad jump record until 1989, when it was broken by Mike Jones.

Al Marshall, class of 1968, played football at Boise State and spent five years playing football for the Denver Broncos. Al competed in the State track meet.

Glenallen Hill, class of 1983, signed with the Toronto Blue Jays right out of high school and started his big league career with them. Later he played for the San Francisco Giants, Chicago Cubs, Cleveland Indians, Seattle Mariners and helped the New York Yankees win the world series. After playing in the big leagues, he continued as a coach in the minors and later in the big leagues. He is still coaching with the Colorado Rockies in 1912.

Johnny Johnson, class of 1986. Played football and spent some time with the basketball team at San Jose State. He finished his football career as a halfback for the Phoenix (now Arizona) Cardinals due to an injury. He made it to the Pro Bowl in his first season of professional football.


NEW SCHS BASEBALL FIELD

March 11, 2000. Play Ball! Dodge Field Dedicated Today.
Back when it all started in August of 1997, Doug Cook’s motivation to get involved with the building of a new diamond for the SC baseball team was easy to understand. Cook wanted a more permanent place for his son, Jeff, then a junior, to play his games. At the time, Jeff and his SC teammates were playing games on what was a neutral site–Harvey West Park– due to the unplayable conditions at the school.. The parents were tired of the baseball team being the only high school in the county without a diamond.
Parents of the players, led by new baseball coach Bob Kittle, decided it was time to give their sons a true home field where the old one once stood. “When I first said this was what I was going to do, people said I was an idiot,” Kittle said. “I was determined. I wasn’t going to stop unless they fired me or I got the field built.
At the beginning parents did not forsee much of a problem. “We thought getting the field built would be a slam-dunk project,” Cook said. As anyone familiar with the annals of SC baseball can attest, Cook couldn’t have been more wrong. If it wasn’t upset neighbors’ disapproval of the prospect of increased traffic, it was the concern over disturbing what was once a site inhabited by Ohlone Indians.
Whatever it was, it wasn’t a “slam dunk.” The project, now almost four years in the making, will only now be finished.
“Personally, it will be emotional,” said Cook, who continued to coordinate the diamonds construction even after his son graduated in 1998. “When the first official game is played, that is when it will be really emotional.”
To get to this point, Cook estimated there was more than 6,000 volunteer hours put into the building of this field of dreams. Cook also estimated that the cost of the project probably would have been in the neighborhood of $155,000, if not for most of the building materials and labor being donated. In the end, the only thing SC high had to pay for was the backstop.
“Initially it was very tough because we needed the approval of the school board,” said Cook, who received the initial go-ahead in August 1998. Once that happened it’s been really easy. “All I’ve had to do is ask for people to help.” Those volunteers gave up at least 50 weekends, Kittle estimated. “The only thing we needed to convince people of was that the effort would be there on our part,” Kittle said.
Once the Santa Cruz parents and players showed their intentions to hold up their side of the bargain, professional help seemed to pour in. Granite Rock donated concrete, Big Creek and San Lorenzo lumber yards provided materials for the dugouts. Bob Eaton, a former Cardinal and his friends donated $3,000 worth of truck time to drive past Napa to pick up the same kind of infield dirt used by the Oakland A’s. Central Home Supply donated manure and sawdust to help revive the outfield grass. Private donors paid for things such as the infield dirt. What they couldn’t get free of monetary charge, parents were able to raise tens of thousands of dollars to pay for them.
Deanie Lindgren a very involved parent who’s been working more than a year ,said that between 30 and 40 kids have come out to help at the four work-days so far. It has created a sense of camaraderie among the players on the varsity, junior varsity and freshman teams. “In five or ten years, they’ll be able to say, “I rebuilt this field. Lindgren, whose son is a sophomore on the team, said Doug Cook and his wife Judy deserve much of the credit for the progress so far. (a sublet to this, Lindgrens son Brett is now an assistant baseball coach at UC Davis in 2012 after playing college ball at Eastern Carolina)
“To see all the people that have helped out is unbelievable,” Kittle said.

Goods and Services contributors include”
Sampson Engineering, Inc
Big Creek Lumber
Granite Rock
David Doan Construction
Granite Construction
Robert Eaton Trucking
Central Home Supply
Dunbar & Craid
Bosso, Williams, Sach et al.
Mike Windt

Major $$ donations received to date from:
Mission Tile
Devco Oil Inc.
Ted Schaal
Erick J. Eklund, DDS
Santa Cruz County Sentinel
North County Recovery & Tow
Cowell’s Beach n Bikini
Robert Baker

Thank you to Coach Bob Kittle, his players and parents in letter to the Sentinel from Bill Dodge, who feels fortunate to have coached the SC baseball teams from 1957 to 1986.

We want to give credit to Coach Kittle for having the vision and enthusiasm to make a beautiful new ball part a reality and to a very dedicated group of parents who never gave up. If you could equate the effort and tenacity of the parents in this project to a baseball team, they would never have lost a game.

It also required a lot of effort from his coaches and players, with help from the parents, advertisers, donors and contributors of materials and labor. What a great community effort. The end result is one they all can be proud.

Before the dedication Saturday, the players brought hand mowers from home to cut the grass on the whole field, because the ground was too wet for the regular mowers. This is just a small sample of the work put in by the players.

My name is attached to the field and I feel it is a compliment to everyone involved while I was at SCHS. My long time partner, Ray Hunter, players who came back to help coach, the players, scorekeepers, parents and the other followers of the teams all of whom made me feel very fortunate to be at SCHS.

Our role was only to provide some direction. The success and the pride of the teams came from the players.

When people see the name of the field, it will bring back many good memories of the teams and players, who they knew and respected for the way they played the game.

Everyone I talked to on Saturday was impressed with how the field looked. On behalf of the 1957 through 1986 teams, I would like to thank everyone who has been involved in making the new baseball diamond possible.


NEW SCHS BASEBALL FIELD

March 11, 2000. Play Ball! Dodge Field Dedicated Today.
Back when it all started in August of 1997, Doug Cook’s motivation to get involved with the building of a new diamond for the SC baseball team was easy to understand. Cook wanted a more permanent place for his son, Jeff, then a junior, to play his games. At the time, Jeff and his SC teammates were playing games on what was a neutral site–Harvey West Park– due to the unplayable conditions at the school.. The parents were tired of the baseball team being the only high school in the county without a diamond.
Parents of the players, led by new baseball coach Bob Kittle, decided it was time to give their sons a true home field where the old one once stood. “When I first said this was what I was going to do, people said I was an idiot,” Kittle said. “I was determined. I wasn’t going to stop unless they fired me or I got the field built.
At the beginning parents did not forsee much of a problem. “We thought getting the field built would be a slam-dunk project,” Cook said. As anyone familiar with the annals of SC baseball can attest, Cook couldn’t have been more wrong. If it wasn’t upset neighbors’ disapproval of the prospect of increased traffic, it was the concern over disturbing what was once a site inhabited by Ohlone Indians.
Whatever it was, it wasn’t a “slam dunk.” The project, now almost four years in the making, will only now be finished.
“Personally, it will be emotional,” said Cook, who continued to coordinate the diamonds construction even after his son graduated in 1998. “When the first official game is played, that is when it will be really emotional.”
To get to this point, Cook estimated there was more than 6,000 volunteer hours put into the building of this field of dreams. Cook also estimated that the cost of the project probably would have been in the neighborhood of $155,000, if not for most of the building materials and labor being donated. In the end, the only thing SC high had to pay for was the backstop.
“Initially it was very tough because we needed the approval of the school board,” said Cook, who received the initial go-ahead in August 1998. Once that happened it’s been really easy. “All I’ve had to do is ask for people to help.” Those volunteers gave up at least 50 weekends, Kittle estimated. “The only thing we needed to convince people of was that the effort would be there on our part,” Kittle said.
Once the Santa Cruz parents and players showed their intentions to hold up their side of the bargain, professional help seemed to pour in. Granite Rock donated concrete, Big Creek and San Lorenzo lumber yards provided materials for the dugouts. Bob Eaton, a former Cardinal and his friends donated $3,000 worth of truck time to drive past Napa to pick up the same kind of infield dirt used by the Oakland A’s. Central Home Supply donated manure and sawdust to help revive the outfield grass. Private donors paid for things such as the infield dirt. What they couldn’t get free of monetary charge, parents were able to raise tens of thousands of dollars to pay for them.
Deanie Lindgren a very involved parent who’s been working more than a year ,said that between 30 and 40 kids have come out to help at the four work-days so far. It has created a sense of camaraderie among the players on the varsity, junior varsity and freshman teams. “In five or ten years, they’ll be able to say, “I rebuilt this field. Lindgren, whose son is a sophomore on the team, said Doug Cook and his wife Judy deserve much of the credit for the progress so far. (a sublet to this, Lindgrens son Brett is now an assistant baseball coach at UC Davis in 2012 after playing college ball at Eastern Carolina)
“To see all the people that have helped out is unbelievable,” Kittle said.

Goods and Services contributors include”
Sampson Engineering, Inc
Big Creek Lumber
Granite Rock
David Doan Construction
Granite Construction
Robert Eaton Trucking
Central Home Supply
Dunbar & Craid
Bosso, Williams, Sach et al.
Mike Windt

Major $$ donations received to date from:
Mission Tile
Devco Oil Inc.
Ted Schaal
Erick J. Eklund, DDS
Santa Cruz County Sentinel
North County Recovery & Tow
Cowell’s Beach n Bikini
Robert Baker

Thank you to Coach Bob Kittle, his players and parents in letter to the Sentinel from Bill Dodge, who feels fortunate to have coached the SC baseball teams from 1957 to 1986.

We want to give credit to Coach Kittle for having the vision and enthusiasm to make a beautiful new ball part a reality and to a very dedicated group of parents who never gave up. If you could equate the effort and tenacity of the parents in this project to a baseball team, they would never have lost a game.

It also required a lot of effort from his coaches and players, with help from the parents, advertisers, donors and contributors of materials and labor. What a great community effort. The end result is one they all can be proud.

Before the dedication Saturday, the players brought hand mowers from home to cut the grass on the whole field, because the ground was too wet for the regular mowers. This is just a small sample of the work put in by the players.

My name is attached to the field and I feel it is a compliment to everyone involved while I was at SCHS. My long time partner, Ray Hunter, players who came back to help coach, the players, scorekeepers, parents and the other followers of the teams all of whom made me feel very fortunate to be at SCHS.

Our role was only to provide some direction. The success and the pride of the teams came from the players.

When people see the name of the field, it will bring back many good memories of the teams and players, who they knew and respected for the way they played the game.

Everyone I talked to on Saturday was impressed with how the field looked. On behalf of the 1957 through 1986 teams, I would like to thank everyone who has been involved in making the new baseball diamond possible.

Leave a Reply